Pile Design and Tests for Integral Abutment Bridges, HR-273, 1987

(1987) Pile Design and Tests for Integral Abutment Bridges, HR-273, 1987. Transportation, Department of

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Abstract

Expansion joints increase both the initial cost and the maintenance cost of bridges. Integral abutment bridges provide an attractive design alternative because expansion joints are eliminated from the bridge itself. However, the piles in these bridges are subjected to horizontal movement as the bridge expands and contracts during temperature changes. The objective of this research was to develop a method of designing piles for these conditions. Separate field tests simulating a pile and a bridge girder were conducted for three loading cases: (1) vertical load only, (2) horizontal displacement of pile head only, and (3) combined horizontal displacement of pile head with subsequent vertical load. Both tests (1) and (3) reached the same ultimate vertical load, that is, the horizontal displacement had no effect on the vertical load capacity. Several model tests were conducted in sand with a scale factor of about 1:10. Experimental results from both the field and model tests were used to develop the vertical and horizontal load-displacement properties of the soil. These properties were input into the finite element computer program Integral Abutment Bridge Two-Dimensional (IAB2D), which was developed under a previous research contract. Experimental and analytical results compared well for the test cases. Two alternative design methods, both based upon the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Specification, were developed. Alternative One is quite conservative relative to IAB2D results and does not permit plastic redistribution of forces. Alternative Two is also conservative when compared to IAB2D, but plastic redistribution is permitted. To use Alternative Two, the pile cross section must have sufficient inelastic rotation capacity before local buckling occurs. A design example for a friction pile and an end-bearing pile illustrates both alternatives.

Item Type: Departmental Report
Keywords: Alternatives analysis, Bridge abutments, Bridge design, Bridges, Design methods, Dislocation (Geology), End bearing piles, Field tests, Friction piles, Loads, Piles (Supports), Properties of materials, Scale models, Soils, Structural design, Integral bridges, Model tests, Soil properties, Vertical loads
Subjects: Transportation
Transportation > Bridges and tunnels
Transportation > Roads and highways
Transportation > Design and Construction
ID Code: 16365
Deposited By: Iowa DOT Library
Deposited On: 17 Mar 2014 19:50
Last Modified: 05 Nov 2014 15:55
URI: http://publications.iowa.gov/id/eprint/16365