Integration of Bridge Damage Detection Concepts and Components (3 volumes), TR-636, 2013

(2013) Integration of Bridge Damage Detection Concepts and Components (3 volumes), TR-636, 2013. Transportation, Department of

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Abstract

This work is divided into three volumes: Volume I: Strain-Based Damage Detection; Volume II: Acceleration-Based Damage Detection; Volume III: Wireless Bridge Monitoring Hardware. Volume I: In this work, a previously-developed structural health monitoring (SHM) system was advanced toward a ready-for-implementation system. Improvements were made with respect to automated data reduction/analysis, data acquisition hardware, sensor types, and communication network architecture. The statistical damage-detection tool, control-chart-based damage-detection methodologies, were further investigated and advanced. For the validation of the damage-detection approaches, strain data were obtained from a sacrificial specimen attached to the previously-utilized US 30 Bridge over the South Skunk River (in Ames, Iowa), which had simulated damage,. To provide for an enhanced ability to detect changes in the behavior of the structural system, various control chart rules were evaluated. False indications and true indications were studied to compare the damage detection ability in regard to each methodology and each control chart rule. An autonomous software program called Bridge Engineering Center Assessment Software (BECAS) was developed to control all aspects of the damage detection processes. BECAS requires no user intervention after initial configuration and training. Volume II: In this work, a previously developed structural health monitoring (SHM) system was advanced toward a ready-for-implementation system. Improvements were made with respect to automated data reduction/analysis, data acquisition hardware, sensor types, and communication network architecture. The objective of this part of the project was to validate/integrate a vibration-based damage-detection algorithm with the strain-based methodology formulated by the Iowa State University Bridge Engineering Center. This report volume (Volume II) presents the use of vibration-based damage-detection approaches as local methods to quantify damage at critical areas in structures. Acceleration data were collected and analyzed to evaluate the relationships between sensors and with changes in environmental conditions. A sacrificial specimen was investigated to verify the damage-detection capabilities and this volume presents a transmissibility concept and damage-detection algorithm that show potential to sense local changes in the dynamic stiffness between points across a joint of a real structure. The validation and integration of the vibration-based and strain-based damage-detection methodologies will add significant value to Iowa’s current and future bridge maintenance, planning, and management Volume III: In this work, a previously developed structural health monitoring (SHM) system was advanced toward a ready-for-implementation system. Improvements were made with respect to automated data reduction/analysis, data acquisition hardware, sensor types, and communication network architecture. This report volume (Volume III) summarizes the energy harvesting techniques and prototype development for a bridge monitoring system that uses wireless sensors. The wireless sensor nodes are used to collect strain measurements at critical locations on a bridge. The bridge monitoring hardware system consists of a base station and multiple self-powered wireless sensor nodes. The base station is responsible for the synchronization of data sampling on all nodes and data aggregation. Each wireless sensor node include a sensing element, a processing and wireless communication module, and an energy harvesting module. The hardware prototype for a wireless bridge monitoring system was developed and tested on the US 30 Bridge over the South Skunk River in Ames, Iowa. The functions and performance of the developed system, including strain data, energy harvesting capacity, and wireless transmission quality, were studied and are covered in this volume.

Item Type: Departmental Report
Keywords: Bridge engineering, bridges, Joints (Engineering), remote sensing, sensors, software, structural health monitoring, Tolerances (Engineering), Bridge Engineering Center Assessment Software, BECAS, Ames, U.S. Highway 30, Skunk River, Iowa State University Bridge Engineering Center
Subjects: Transportation
Transportation > Bridges and tunnels
Transportation > Research
ID Code: 15126
Deposited By: Leighton Christiansen
Deposited On: 29 Oct 2013 20:21
Last Modified: 29 Oct 2013 20:21
URI: http://publications.iowa.gov/id/eprint/15126